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The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) final “Made in USA” (MUSA) rule was published in the Federal Register on July 14, 2021 (86 FR 37022). The rule applies to all labels, whether they appear on product packaging or online, and includes mail order catalogs or mail order promotional materials that include a seal, mark, tag, or stamp declaring goods are “Made in the USA,” “Made in America,” or the equivalent thereof.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and Food and Drug Administrator Commissioner Stephen M. Hahn, M.D, reiterated on June 24 that, “There is no evidence that people can contract COVID-19 from food or from food packaging.” The declaration was part of a joint statement made in response to food export restrictions pertaining to COVID-19.

Is the Country Where a Product is Assembled Considered the Country of Origin?

With respect to Country of Origin (COO) labeling requirements, could a complete system that is assembled in Finland, with goods that come from...

On September 26, 2019, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hosted a public workshop on "Made in USA" (MIU) and other U.S. origin claims.

Keller and Heckman Partner Katia Merten-Lentz will speak at the Food Law in Asia: Export, Labeling and Countering Fraud Conference. Her presentation, “Export from the EU to China: General Trade Issues,” will include information on registration and general requirements for export, mandatory labeling requirements, and novel foods. For more information on the conference or to register, click here.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) announced that, starting February 20, 2017, certificates of free sale (COFS) for food products will be issued electronically as downloadable PDFs. COFS are issued for certain food products regulated by CFSAN, upon request by an exporter.  While FDA does not require the issuance of such certificates to export foods to foreign countries, a COFS may be required by a foreign country as part of the import process.

Effective March 2016, China’s General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) has imposed disinsection requirements on all shipments coming from Zika-affected countries and regions.  AQSIQ continues to maintain and update its list of Zika-affected areas, and the United States was added to that list on August 5, 2016.   With this in mind, staff from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, including officials from the U.S.